An Interview with Geert Lovink

Interview with the Dutch-Australian media theorist and critic Geert Lovink to be submitted for a special issue of Internet Histories dedicated to Internet and the Web in the 90s (see the CfP), edited by Valérie Schafer and Benjamin G. Thierry (second semester of 2018).

G. Lovink at CPOV-Conference in Leipzig Germany; September 2010
Photo by Rob Irgendwer
CC BY-SA 3.0

Valérie Schafer: First of all, could you tell me when you discovered computers and computer-mediated communications?

Geert Lovink: My first encounter with the world of computers was at the end of my primary school, in the late 1960s. This was a rather intense time for the Magic Centre of Amsterdam and the hippie movement, a rather turbulent time. I got influenced by the promises of computers from the hippie perspective, how people can communicate, influenced by the psychedelic movement, which of course one can read back in Fred Turner’s book[1]. This context is closely tied to the questions of how software should look like and how the user should be positioned in there. This topic is something I was really intimately familiar with when I grew up.

VS: Did your parents work in this field?

GL: No, I grew up near the Vondelpark in Amsterdam, behind the Concertgebouw. Almost next door to my primary school was the Hilton hotel where John Lennon and Yoko Ono stayed when the hippies took over the park where I played, in 1969. Of course, I’m not from the ‘68 generation, I’m younger, from the punk generation, I entered the scene in 1977. But as a child I was very influenced by the counterculture that happened in front of where I grew up. My first direct encounter with computers was somewhat odd. I was twelve, thirteen years old. With a friend of mine I decided to become a member of a rowing club in Amsterdam. We started rowing on the river Amstel and while we were doing these explorations from the water we came across a strange metal junk yard where the first generation of mainframe computers were dumped and recycled. We could access the yard via the water. We often went there to have a look at these machines. At that time, my friend and I were interested in DIY electronics, in particular transistors. We then traded the large circuit boards we took from there with our friends.

A couple of years later, when I studied political science in Amsterdam at the university, of course I encountered these mainframes again. That was in 1978-1979. We had to learn SPSS and data processing. This was done in the tradition of the Baschwitz institute, which studied public opinion. Kurt Baschwitz is one of the founders of mass communication and he was introducing computers in social sciences. We had to do questionnaires and then process the results using these mainframes.

Around 1983-1984 the personal computer became affordable and available, with the introduction of the IBM PC combined with MS-DOS, the Microsoft operating system. We started to use it. We were running a weekly magazine for the squatter’s movement in Amsterdam and very early on we used the computer to do text processing. Friends of mine also started to use the computer to build databases in the early 1980s, to trace neo-Fascist groups and map housing speculators. These were early database and mapping exercises. The use of computers and databases in social movements goes back a really long time. Activists gathered names, dates and observations. There are archives that try to conserve the autonomous social movement heritage and I’m also playing a role in this preservation effort at the International Institute of Social History (IISG), which is in Amsterdam. IISG has extended its archives, which focused on Marx, Bakunin, early trade unions and the Spanish civil war to contemporary movements such as feminism and ecology.

When the squatter’s episode of my generation came to a close, in 1987, with the help of my father, I purchased my first personal computer.

VS: Did you feel early on that there was a need to archive this history?

GL: My studies started with a visit to the Institute of Social History. The first paper I wrote, I was 19 years old, was on the history of the provo movement[2] which I had witnessed as a child. Back then I was too young and I couldn’t really understand much of it. I went back to the archives, to study that movement ten or so years later – a movement that had had a big impact on Amsterdam and was foundational to the squatter’s movement. Archival work has always been an important task for social movements to pass on collective experiences, images, concepts and debates.

VS: Would you say that your investment in digital cultures and social movements is a continuity of this starting period?

GL: For sure. We’re aware of similar struggles before WWII. But we also knew, in particular in the city of Amsterdam that was so severely hit by the Holocaust, that the rupture of WWII and the following decades of conservative reconstruction created a gap in the collective memory. We met few people in our field, only one or two, that were able to bring the memory of the pre-war back. It was a bit more common with the 60s movement. Memory and its transition from one generation to the next, a strong theme in the work of Bernard Stiegler that I admire, were at the forefront when I grew up.

VS: You bought your own computer in 1987.

Lire la suite

Entretien avec Jean-Michel Cornu

Dans cet entretien réalisé en mars 2017 par Michel Elie, Jean-Michel Cornu revient sur son parcours, sa découverte de l’informatique ou encore sa participation à ce qui devient la gouvernance de l’Internet et ses organes types IETF ou Isoc.

JEAN-MICHEL CORNU, INGENIEUR DIPLOMÉ DE L’INSTITUT D’ELECTRONIQUE DE PARIS, EXPERT DANS LES NOUVELLES TECHNOLOGIES

Jean-Michel Cornu revient sur son parcours, sa découverte de  l’informatique d’abord à travers le minitel et des projets de stations de travail, puis par le choix de participer à titre individuel aux différents groupes de travail autour des spécifications et de la  gouvernance de l’Internet : IETF ou ISOC. C’est en observant leurs  méthodes de travail fondées sur le travail coopératif qu’il prendra  l’initiative d’évènements associatifs tels que l’Internet Fiesta au plan  international, puis se consacrera à l’approfondissement des méthodes de  travail coopératif et d’animation de groupes de travail.

Entretien avec Jean-Claude Michot (1/2)

Le parcours de Jean-Claude Michot, qui s’inscrit à la fois dans les innovations télématiques des années 1980 et 1990 et dans celles qui touchent à Internet et au Web dans la décennie 1990, témoigne d’une continuité certaine dans l’histoire du numérique et de ses cultures. Cette continuité est palpable dans l’aventure France Teaser qu’il retrace pour nous, depuis la création de la société pour permettre de télécharger des logiciels via Minitel à son passage sur le réseau des réseaux. Mais c’est aussi dans QBBS, BBS du 3614 que se lit une continuité d’usages, ici moins informatiques que communicationnels. De France Teaser à Gandi, Jean-Claude Michot éclaire aussi plus généralement le contexte entrepreneurial d’une économie numérique en plein développement.

 

Entretien avec Christophe Wolfhugel du 28 juillet 2017

Dans cet entretien, Christophe Wolfhugel revient sur son parcours et sa découverte des réseaux, son souhait de casser le monopole sur les Newsgroups de Fnet en France, la création du premier serveur IRC en France, des groupes Usenet fr. et de leurs prédécesseurs, la fondation d’Oléane ou encore son investissement dans l’AUI (Association des utilisateurs d’Internet). Un témoignage riche autant pour découvrir le tournant de la décennie 1990 que le monde des premiers FAI et le développement des échanges en réseaux hors de la sphère des laboratoires.

Entretien avec Pierre Beyssac du 20 juillet 2017

En ce mois de juillet  2017, les entretiens se multiplient pour notre plus grand plaisir. Après celui avec messieurs de Maublanc et Haladjian, c’était au tour de Pierre Beyssac de venir éclairer notre histoire. De sa découverte de l’informatique et des réseaux, de Usenet ou de  Fnet à la création de Gandi, il revient pour nous sur tout un pan du développement des réseaux, d’Internet puis du Web en France.

 

Entretien avec Henri de Maublanc et Rafi Haladjian (partie 1)

Le 7 juillet 2017 Henri de Maublanc et Rafi Haladjian nous faisaient le plaisir de revenir sur leurs parcours qui, du Minitel à Internet et au Web, fait d’eux des témoins de premier plan de la période que couvre notre projet. Du kiosque et des messageries roses à la naissance des premiers FAI, dont Francenet, et des premiers sites de vente en ligne sur le Web, nous avons notamment exploré grâce à eux les enjeux économiques et commerciaux du numérique.

Entretien réalisé par Valérie Schafer, Michel Elie et Victoria Peuvrelle

Entretien du 22 mai avec MM. Charnay et Wojcik (partie 1)

Nous remercions MM.  Wojcek Wojcik et Daniel Charnay, ingénieurs informaticiens au Centre de Calcul IN2P3, qui dès 1992 lancent le premier serveur Web français, de nous avoir accordé cet entretien et d’être revenus sur leur découverte du Web et son implantation pionnière à l’IN2P3.

Daniel Charnay, ingénieur réseaux au CC IN2P3, était invité par Mathieu Vidart à l’émission de France Inter « la Tête au carré », pour parler des débuts du World Wide Web en France et dans le monde. (Ré)écouter l’émission 

Voir également sur le site de l’IN2P3 les entretiens croisés de Wojcek Wojcik et Daniel Charnay, ingénieurs informaticiens au Centre de Calcul IN2P3 qui dès 1992 lance le premier serveur Web français.

Entretien du 22 mai avec MM. Charnay et Wojcik (partie 2)

Nous remercions MM.  Wojcek Wojcik et Daniel Charnay, ingénieurs informaticiens au Centre de Calcul IN2P3, qui dès 1992 lancent le premier serveur Web français, de nous avoir accordé cet entretien et d’être revenus sur leur découverte du Web et son implantation pionnière à l’IN2P3.

Daniel Charnay, ingénieur réseaux au CC IN2P3, était invité par Mathieu Vidart à l’émission de France Inter « la Tête au carré », pour parler des débuts du World Wide Web en France et dans le monde. (Ré)écouter l’émission 

Voir également sur le site de l’IN2P3 les entretiens croisés de Wojcek Wojcik et Daniel Charnay, ingénieurs informaticiens au Centre de Calcul IN2P3 qui dès 1992 lance le premier serveur Web français.

Entretien avec Jean-Jacques Peyraud (1/3)

Le 3 mars 2017 nous sommes partis à la découverte des coulisses de la rubrique hebdomadaire du Soir 3 dédiée aux réseaux de 1996 à 1999, créée et animée par Jean-Jacques Peyraud. L’ancien journaliste revient sur cette aventure télévisuelle pionnière. Outre le caractère pédagogique de cette séquence, qui fait découvrir la Toile aux Français et dont nous avons exploré les coulisses (techniques, organisationnelles, etc.), J-J. Peyraud nous livre également l’histoire du site Web créé pour la chaîne au même moment et qu’il anime et alimente, et partage avec nous ses souvenirs et son regard sur le rapport entre télévision et diffusion d’Internet et du Web dans les années 1990.


Séquence du 19 décembre 1996, rencontre avec le Père Noël. (Archives INA, Soir 3)

Entretien avec Jean-Jacques Peyraud 2/3

Deuxième partie de notre entretien avec Jean-Jacques Peyraud, ancien journaliste à France 3, qui de 1996 à 1999 anime une rubrique hebdomadaire au JT dédiée aux réseaux, mais aussi le site de la chaîne.

Pour retrouver tous les textes de sa rubrique, intitulée Réseaux puis Sur le Net, voir les archives de l’émission qu’il a constituées.

Entretien avec Jean-Jacques Peyraud 3/3

Troisième partie de notre entretien avec Jean-Jacques Peyraud, ancien journaliste à France 3, où il est question de Foot, de la coupe du Monde 1998  …

Voir le dossier consacré à la Coupe du monde 98 et conservé dans Internet Archive

Voir également la page consacrée auparavant aux Jeux Olympiques de Nagano

Présentation de quelques sites à thématique sportive dans la rubrique Réseaux le 30 mai 1996. (Archives INA)

Mais évidemment  il est aussi dans cet entretien de conservation et d’histoire d’Internet et du Web à la télévision.

Cinq émissions sur France culture dédiées à l’histoire d’Internet

Capture d’écran 2016-09-02 à 07.58.45Présentées par Julien Goetz.
Les écouter

60/70’s : l’écho psychédélique du bout des tuyaux

70/80’s : cowboys nomades, astragale et feux de camps électriques

Les années 1990 : Un Web et des bulles

Les années 2000 : sous les pop-up, l’indépendance

Un Internet à la dérive. Des internets en résistance