Introduction au parcours guidé BnF : Le Web des années 1990

© Archives de l'internet - Bibliothèque nationale de France© BnF

L’équipe Web90 est heureuse de vous annoncer la réalisation d’un parcours guidé dans le Web des années 1990 en collaboration avec la BnF. Au fil de 11 thèmes et de la sélection d’une centaine d’archives du Web, remontez le temps et découvrez la variété, la richesse mais aussi les tâtonnements de la Toile du passé.

Cfp Journal Internet histories : submissions open

capture-decran-2016-10-04-a-17-30-56Find out how to submit to the journal at www.tandfonline.com/rint

The title of the journal, Internet Histories , suggests there is not one single and fixed Internet history going straight from Arpanet to the Internet as we know it today, from United States to a world-wide network. Rather, there are multiple local, regional and national paths and a variety of ways that the internet has been imagined, designed, used, shaped, and regulated around the world. Internet Histories: Digital Technology, Culture and Society aims to publish a range of scholarship that examines the global and internetworked nature of the digital world as well as situated histories that account for diverse local contexts.

Looking for GIF?

Internet Archive propose un nouveau service qui réjouira les amateurs de tigres bondissants et de dancing babies, et tous ceux pour qui le Web du passé ne se conçoit pas sans une étude de la culture visuelle qui l’accompagnait. Par une recherche par mots-clé s’ouvre la possibilité de retrouver des gifs, et de les recontextualiser en consultant l’archive qui les contenait.

capture-decran-2016-10-27-a-17-01-41

Internet Archive https://web.archive.org/web/20091022195036/http://geocities.com/rod46241/newsflash.html

Internet Archive
https://web.archive.org/web/20091022195036/http://geocities.com/rod46241/newsflash.html

 

 

An Archaeological Study of Web Tracking from 1996 to 2016

Adam Lerner, Anna Kornfeld Simpson, Tadayoshi Kohno, Franziska Roesner, (2016). « Internet Jones and the Raiders of the Lost Trackers: An Archaeological Study of Web Tracking from 1996 to 2016 », 25th USENIX Security Symposium, August 2016.

Résumé

Though web tracking and its privacy implications have received much attention in recent years, that attention has come relatively recently in the history of the web and lacks full historical context. In this paper, we present longitudinal measurements of third-party web tracking behaviors from 1996 to present (2016). Our tool, TrackingExcavator, leverages a key insight: that the Internet Archive’s Wayback Machine opens the pos- sibility for a retrospective analysis of tracking over time. We contribute an evaluation of the Wayback Machine’s view of past third-party requests, which we find is im- perfect — we evaluate its limitations and unearth lessons and strategies for overcoming them. Applying these strategies in our measurements, we discover (among other findings) that third-party tracking on the web has increased in prevalence and complexity since the first third-party tracker that we observe in 1996, and we see the spread of the most popular trackers to an increasing percentage of the most popular sites on the web. We ar- gue that an understanding of the ecosystem’s historical trends — which we provide for the first time at this scale in our work — is important to any technical and policy discussions surrounding tracking.

Lire l’article 

SAGE Handbook of Web History

Simon Gee Giraudot Geektionnerd CC By-Sa

Simon Gee Giraudot
Geektionnerd
CC By-Sa

The web has now been with us for almost 25 years: new media is simply not that new anymore. It has developed to become an inherent part of our social, cultural, political, and social lives, and is accordingly leaving behind a detailed documentary record of society and events since the advent of widespread web archiving in 1996. These two key points lie at the heart of our in-preparation Handbook of Web History: that the history of the web itself needs to be studied, but also that its value as an incomparable historical record needs to be inquired as well. Within the last decade, considerable interest in the history of the Web has emerged. However, there is no comprehensive review of the field. Accordingly, our SAGE Handbook of Web History will provide an overview and point to future research directions.

The editors, Niels Brügger, Megan Sapnar Ankerson, and Ian Milligan, have over twenty-five chapters in preparation. However, there are a few areas where we are soliciting additional chapters to round out our handbook. The focus of the chapters needs to be on the subject of Web history.
* Business histories of the Web;
* Web governance;
* E-Literature or Web Art;
* History of online social media;
* Dot-com Start-ups
* Memes
* Hacking and Activism
* Video on the Web
* Asia and the Web
If you are interested, they are soliciting 300 – 500 word abstracts by 10 October 2016. If you have any questions, or wish to discuss a potential submission, please e-mail us via Ian Milligan at i2millig@uwaterloo.ca. Final chapters will be a maximum of 7,000 words and would be due by 1 March 2017.

Call for Papers: Workshop on National Webs

December 8-9, 2016

Aarhus University and the State Library, Denmark

How can you study national webs? How are national webs today different from how they were 10 years ago? Is it possible to compare national webs? And what are the IT-related challenges when doing these kinds of studies?

These are some of the questions that will be addressed at a workshop on national webs, organised by the research project ‘The historical development of the Danish web’ (supported by the Danish Ministry of Culture), in collaboration with NetLab, Aarhus University, and the State Library, Denmark

We never experience the entire national web domain when browsing the web but it is always there as a horizon, as the national context of our browsing. Studies of national webs can provide valuable knowledge about the characteristics and use of different nations’ web. Studies of the history of national webs can shed light on the development and the changing patterns and trends within and across national webs. In addition, studying the characteristics of a national web will result in a baseline for other web studies, for instance by making it possible to determine whether a specific website at a given point in time is comparatively large or small, dynamic or static etc. This will be of use when analysing in-depth the web activities that take place within a nation and to which the national web constitutes the backdrop. It will also allow for international comparisons, both current and historical.

Studies of national web domains is an emerging field within web studies, and the workshop aims to bring together scholars, web archivists, curators and IT-developers working within this area in different countries with a view to advancing the field through knowledge exchange and new possibilities for cooperation.

Submissions could include:

  • theoretical, methodological or case based studies at the intersection between national web studies and Digital Humanities
  • case studies of one or more national webs
  • contemporary cases or a historical perspective
  • theoretical reflections on studying national webs
  • methodological reflections on studying national webs, including discussions about software used for the study.

A selection of the papers from the research workshop will be considered for inclusion in a planned edited volume The Historical Web and Digital Humanities: National Web domains, to be part of a book series about digital research in the Arts and Humanities at an international publisher.

Please send an abstract of up to 300 words to Niels Brügger (nb@cc.au.dk), head of NetLab, Aarhus University. Abstract submission deadline: 14 August, 2016. Notification of acceptance: 1 September, 2016.