Archives of the digital

Studies in Communication and Culture, Volume 8, n° 1, Avril 2017. Coord. de Hermann Rotermund et Christian Herzog.

Table of Contents

Archives of the digital (Hermann Rotermund and Christian Herzog)

The material of memory : Tracing archives in communication studies (Scott Timcke)

Concepts of the database in comtemporary media practice (Ruth Alexandra Moran)

On the impossibility of archiving the radio and its virtues (Wolfgang Hagen)

Lossless compression and future of memory (Marek Jancovic)

Re-using the archive in viceo posters : A win-win for users and archives (Willemien Sanders and Mariana Salgado)

Searching for D-9.com in the archives. An archeology of a film’s website (Kim Louise Walden)

A Louise

Ta disparition n’éteindra pas, Louise, l’amitié que nous te portons, le plaisir de te lire, le souvenir de nos projets passés, le regret de ceux que nous avions à venir, l’honneur et la fierté d’avoir travaillé avec toi. Nous pensons et continuerons tous au sein de l’équipe Web90 de penser très fort à toi.

CfP HistoInformatics2017 – the 4th International Workshop on Computational History

HistoInformatics2017 – the 4th International Workshop on Computational History will be held on 6 November, 2017 in conjunction with the 26th ACM International Conference on Information and Knowledge Management (CIKM 2017), Singapore. Traditionally, historical research is based on the hermeneutic investigation of preserved records and artifacts to provide a reliable account of the past and to discuss different hypotheses. Alongside this hermeneutic approach historians have always been interested to translate primary sources into data and used methods, often borrowed from the Social Sciences, to analyze them. A new wealth of digitized historical documents have however opened up completely new challenges for the computer-assisted analysis of e.g. large text or image corpora. Historians can greatly benefit from the advances of Computer and Information sciences which are dedicated to the processing, organization and analysis of such data. New computational techniques can be applied to help verify and validate historical assumptions. We call this approach HistoInformatics, analogous to Bioinformatics and ChemoInformatics which have respectively proposed new research trends in Biology and Chemistry. The main topics of the proposed workshop are: (1) support for historical research and analysis in general through the application of Computer Science theories or technologies, (2) analysis and re-use of historical texts, (3) analysis of collective memories, (4) visualisations of historical data, (4) access to large wealth of accumulated historical knowledge.

This is a highly interdisciplinary workshop that goes beyond traditional computer science topics. The workshop emphasizes non-standard, research-oriented informatics technologies for solving novel research problems and scenarios. Our objective is to provide for the two different research communities a place to meet and exchange ideas and to facilitate discussion. We hope the workshop will result in a survey of current problems and potential solutions, with particular focus on exploring opportunities for collaboration and interaction of researchers working on various subareas within Computer Science and History Sciences.

read more