Cfp Journal Internet histories : submissions open

capture-decran-2016-10-04-a-17-30-56Find out how to submit to the journal at www.tandfonline.com/rint

The title of the journal, Internet Histories , suggests there is not one single and fixed Internet history going straight from Arpanet to the Internet as we know it today, from United States to a world-wide network. Rather, there are multiple local, regional and national paths and a variety of ways that the internet has been imagined, designed, used, shaped, and regulated around the world. Internet Histories: Digital Technology, Culture and Society aims to publish a range of scholarship that examines the global and internetworked nature of the digital world as well as situated histories that account for diverse local contexts.

CFP : The Digital Public Sphere in Question: From Counter- to Crypto-Publics.

Fengersfors (Gothenburg area), Sweden, 3-5 mars 2017.

Democracy presupposes a public sphere where citizens can debate their differences and reach mutually binding agreements. The emergence of the public sphere has often been linked to the surge of books and newspapers. Today, however, printed media is in crisis. The advertising revenues of publishing houses are siphoned off by Google and Facebook, while the habit of reading printed media is in steady decline. As a consequence, the journalistic profession is withering away too. It is much disputed whether this counts as a threat to free speech and public debate, or, on the contrary, is a promise to set them free. In different words, can digital media shoulder the same civic responsibilities as conventional media is said to have done in the past? Many are alarmed by a rise in uncivility in public debates, often linked to the anonymity of the computer screen. The graphic interface is said to invite trolling. A related concern is that the search engines are programmed to reinforce pre-existing search patterns. Algorithms create « filter bubbles » that undermine the possibility of developing an informed opinion. Others stress the upside. From the lukewarm promises about e-governance in the 1990s to the pie-in-the-sky visions of liquid democracy today, proposals are not lacking for how citizenship could be reinvigorated thanks to digital media. Other examples are of a more confrontational nature, such as the possibility of anonymous leaks and the surge of crypto-publics in the darknet. The ambiguity of the role of new media reflects a deeper ambiguity in the word ”people” itself. Since 1789, the p-word has interchangeably stood for, on the one hand, equality and democracy, and, on the other, for passion, violence and irrationality.

Lire la suite

AAC : Retours critiques sur les sociologies numériques

La revue Sociologie et sociétés consacrera un dossier aux « Retours critiques sur les sociologies numériques ».

CALENDRIER

  • Remise des propositions d’article pour le 7 janvier 2017
  • Réponse aux auteur.e.s avant le 1er février 2017
  • Remise des articles définitifs (70,000 signes, approximativement 11,000 mots) pour le 12 juin 2017.

Lire l’appel à contribution: aac-sociologie-et-societes

Les propositions sont à envoyer aux coordinateurs du numéro:

Nicolas Baya-Laffite : nicolas.bayalaffite@unil.ch

Bilel Benbouzid : bilel.benbouzid@u-pem.fr

CFP: Special Issue on Technological Expertise and Publics for Communication and The Public (SAGE)

Co-editors:
Andrew R. Schrock
Samantha Close

Submission Deadline: November 15, 2016

Communication has a long and rich history of debating the relationship between publics and expertise. James Carey (1989) famously critiqued Walter Lippmann (1922) for an elitist reliance on expertise in the formation of public opinion. Carey preferred Dewey’s (1927) notion of “public,” deeming Lippmann’s stance elitist. Habermas’ public sphere similarly does not favor experts, and communication as a discipline has largely favored publics over expertise. However, Michael Schudson (2008) suggested that Carey’s framing of the Dewey-Lippmann “debate” favoring publics missed important reasons why expertise is vital to democracy. He argued that Lippman’s intent was that “experts were not to replace the public… rather experts were to provide an alternative source of knowledge and policy” (p. 10).

Technology imposes another level of complexity to this debate. By some readings, a need for technological literacies presents a challenge to public communication. Meritocratic or generation-based theories of “digital natives” and “geeks” seem to preclude the formation of broad-based publics (Prensky, 2001). Early concern about a divide of technological access has moved to focus on the unequal distribution of expertise and opportunities to gain it through acquisition of technical skills and media literacies (Jenkins et al., 2009). New forms of experts and expertise have emerged as particularly important to publics, even vital for their existence. Technological intermediaries, such as hackers, are increasingly important to translate and publicize technological issues of public importance (e.g. open data, digital privacy, surveillance). Networked publics on online platforms require expert maintenance work to exist, even when all members of the public need not be experts. The “horizontalist” movement Occupy developed and appropriated technologies to assist the public in the aftermath of hurricane Sandy. Expertise played a vital role that did not preclude a public, but helped it flourish.

We suggest that expertise and publics have always been productively entangled rather than on opposing sides of a binary. This special issue examines the role of technological expertise in constituting publics, maintaining publics, increasing publics’ communicative capacities, influencing existing structures of cultural and governmental power, and connecting with issues of public concern. We ask a set of related questions: how does expertise contribute to the formation of publics and enabling of collective action? Conversely, when does the unequal distribution of expertise inhibit the constitution of publics? How does expertise create public goods? How does it mediate the societal distribution of power? What are the diverse ways expertise can be conceptualized? What is the relationship between technological expertise and other kinds of expertise, such as communicative or social? How does the line between “the public” and “expert” become crossed or blurred?

Lire la suite

SAGE Handbook of Web History

Simon Gee Giraudot Geektionnerd CC By-Sa

Simon Gee Giraudot
Geektionnerd
CC By-Sa

The web has now been with us for almost 25 years: new media is simply not that new anymore. It has developed to become an inherent part of our social, cultural, political, and social lives, and is accordingly leaving behind a detailed documentary record of society and events since the advent of widespread web archiving in 1996. These two key points lie at the heart of our in-preparation Handbook of Web History: that the history of the web itself needs to be studied, but also that its value as an incomparable historical record needs to be inquired as well. Within the last decade, considerable interest in the history of the Web has emerged. However, there is no comprehensive review of the field. Accordingly, our SAGE Handbook of Web History will provide an overview and point to future research directions.

The editors, Niels Brügger, Megan Sapnar Ankerson, and Ian Milligan, have over twenty-five chapters in preparation. However, there are a few areas where we are soliciting additional chapters to round out our handbook. The focus of the chapters needs to be on the subject of Web history.
* Business histories of the Web;
* Web governance;
* E-Literature or Web Art;
* History of online social media;
* Dot-com Start-ups
* Memes
* Hacking and Activism
* Video on the Web
* Asia and the Web
If you are interested, they are soliciting 300 – 500 word abstracts by 10 October 2016. If you have any questions, or wish to discuss a potential submission, please e-mail us via Ian Milligan at i2millig@uwaterloo.ca. Final chapters will be a maximum of 7,000 words and would be due by 1 March 2017.

Call for papers on Digital Preservation for Alexandria: The Journal of National and International Library and Information Issues

Alexandria: The Journal of National and International Library and Information Issues invites submissions for a themed issue on Digital Preservation.

The scale and diversity of digital collections in national memory institutions has grown immensely over the past decades. The challenges of maintaining and preserving these collections for future generations have been recognized and addressed in various forms, and solution maturity at an international level is diverse. To reflect this diversity and share experiences across the international stage, Alexandria is seeking articles on practical implementation models for digital preservation, staffing and embedding digital preservation expertise, holistic and sustainable solutions, and the implications of local, national and collaborative strategies.

A process of double peer review will be applied. Abstracts are due Tuesday 1 November 2016 and the full manuscript for selected articles will be due Friday 31 March 2017. The themed issue will be published in Summer 2017.

  • Abstracts should be no more than 1000 words.
  • Full articles should be between 4000 and 7500 words long.
  • Short communications should be no more than 3000 words long.

Author guidelines are available at https://uk.sagepub.com/en-gb/eur/alexandria/journal202510#submission-guidelines

Suggested topics : see here

This themed issue will be edited by Maureen Pennock (Head of Digital Preservation at the British Library) and Libor Coufal (Assistant Director, Digital Preservation at the National Library of Australia). Queries about the suitability of a topic should be addressed in the first instance to the Journal Editor, Monica Blake ( info@blakeinformation.com), or Assistant Editor, Lyn Robinson ( L.Robinson@city.ac.uk).

Curation and research use of the past Web (Lisbonne, 29-30 mars 2017)

Web archiving efforts have now been underway for over twenty years, generating an expanding core of data crucial for present and future explorations of human political, cultural, economic and social activity since the mid 1990s. Practices around both the creation and use of web archives are rapidly evolving. What technical, ethical, and institutional approaches are necessary to advance use of web archives for scholarship and other use cases? How are researchers using the archived web right now, and in which new directions is that research heading? What innovations, collaborations, and adaptations are necessary to sustain the efficacy of web archiving?

The 2017 Web Archiving Conference (WAC), held in conjunction with the annual meeting of the International Internet Preservation Consortium (IIPC), aims to bring together practitioners, librarians, archivists, historians, humanists, computer scientists, and other parties interested in expanding and harnessing the potential of preserved web heritage.

We welcome proposals on a broad range of topics, including from the following examples:

USING WEB ARCHIVES

  • Research using web archives
  • Tools and approaches
  • Initiatives, platforms, and collaborations
  • User-driven curation
  • Ethical and compliant research use
  • Interdisciplinary collaboration

CREATING WEB ARCHIVES

  • Harvesting, preservation, and/or access
  • Collection development
  • Legal and ethical concerns
  • Programmatic organization and management
  • New/updated tools for any part of the lifecycle
  • Application programming interfaces (APIs)
  • Current and future landscape

 Proposals may be submitted for any of the following formats:

  • Individual presentation for a 30-minute session (i.e., 20 minutes for presentation plus 10 minutes for questions);
  • Moderated discussion or multi-presentation panel for a 60-minute session;
  • Moderated discussion or multi-presentation panel for a 90-minute session; or
  • Poster with accompanying lightning talk.

 Time will additionally be reserved in the schedule for the proposal of lightning talks much closer to the event to allow for more timely sharing of recent updates.

Please submit your proposals using this formFor questions, please e-mail wac17@iipc.simplelists.com.

The deadline for submissions is 20 October 2016. All submissions will be reviewed by the WAC17 Programme Committee and submitters will be notified by 1 December 2016.
For more information and updates, see:

www.netpreserve.org/general-assembly/2017/overview

@NetPreserve #iipcGA17 #iipcWAC17

image003

CfP: « Interactions: Studies in Communication and Culture », Issue 8.1: Archives of the Digital

Capture d’écran 2016-07-27 à 10.39.00Guest Editors: Hermann Rotermund, Wolfgang Hagen and Christian Herzog
(Leuphana University Lüneburg)

Reminder of the deadline for the submission of full papers: 31 July 2016
The issue is scheduled for publication in Spring 2017.

Digital media has initiated the transformation of archiving practices with implications for audio-visual archives, written archives and libraries. The substitution of finding aids, including paper cards, by databases is in most instances seen as beneficial and an advance.
However, the digitization of archival holdings poses a lot of questions that have not yet been thoroughly discussed. The physical nature of the sources is no longer an obstacle to their universal accessibility. Is digitization thus leading to the disappearance of the emphatic notion of the archive, because digitized materials are becoming mere elements of the constantly growing and flowing mass of data in electronic circuits? Will digital techniques replace the archive as an institution? Do we have to envision archives without records and without a documentation strategy – and documentarists as hackers who build ad hoc collections from randomly commented links?

With regard to broadcast archives, it can be observed that the form and comprehensibility of metadata, access and usage regulations have not kept pace with digitization. How can this asynchrony be dissolved? How can the means of digital technology and the Internet be used to create comprehensible and accessible metadata? How can archives be connected are there historical examples we could learn from?

Articles for this special issue, ‘Archives of the Digital’ could, for example, address ideas and visions for the reconfiguration of archives, or the epistemology of the archive (and its notions), treat exemplary case studies of (interdisciplinary) practices for the interpretation of archival content, or elaborate on the impact of digitization for scholars working in the archives/with archival holdings.

Submission guidelines

Lire la suite

CfP Researchers, practitioners and the archived web

A two-day conference, University of London, United Kingdom, 14–15 June 2017

The second biennial RESAW (Research Infrastructure for the Study of Archived Web Materials) conference.

Organised by the School of Advanced Study, University of London, the British Library, The National Archives of the UK, the Oxford Internet Institute, Aarhus University, L’Institut des sciences de la communication (CNRS, Paris-Sorbonne, UPMC), L3S Research Center – Leibniz University Hannover, the Royal Library, Denmark, the Bibliothèque nationale de France, L’Institut national de l’audiovisuel and Aix-Marseille University.

Lire la suite

Call for Papers: Workshop on National Webs

December 8-9, 2016

Aarhus University and the State Library, Denmark

How can you study national webs? How are national webs today different from how they were 10 years ago? Is it possible to compare national webs? And what are the IT-related challenges when doing these kinds of studies?

These are some of the questions that will be addressed at a workshop on national webs, organised by the research project ‘The historical development of the Danish web’ (supported by the Danish Ministry of Culture), in collaboration with NetLab, Aarhus University, and the State Library, Denmark

We never experience the entire national web domain when browsing the web but it is always there as a horizon, as the national context of our browsing. Studies of national webs can provide valuable knowledge about the characteristics and use of different nations’ web. Studies of the history of national webs can shed light on the development and the changing patterns and trends within and across national webs. In addition, studying the characteristics of a national web will result in a baseline for other web studies, for instance by making it possible to determine whether a specific website at a given point in time is comparatively large or small, dynamic or static etc. This will be of use when analysing in-depth the web activities that take place within a nation and to which the national web constitutes the backdrop. It will also allow for international comparisons, both current and historical.

Studies of national web domains is an emerging field within web studies, and the workshop aims to bring together scholars, web archivists, curators and IT-developers working within this area in different countries with a view to advancing the field through knowledge exchange and new possibilities for cooperation.

Submissions could include:

  • theoretical, methodological or case based studies at the intersection between national web studies and Digital Humanities
  • case studies of one or more national webs
  • contemporary cases or a historical perspective
  • theoretical reflections on studying national webs
  • methodological reflections on studying national webs, including discussions about software used for the study.

A selection of the papers from the research workshop will be considered for inclusion in a planned edited volume The Historical Web and Digital Humanities: National Web domains, to be part of a book series about digital research in the Arts and Humanities at an international publisher.

Please send an abstract of up to 300 words to Niels Brügger (nb@cc.au.dk), head of NetLab, Aarhus University. Abstract submission deadline: 14 August, 2016. Notification of acceptance: 1 September, 2016.